Post of the Day — Manpower Employment Blawg

August 26, 2009

Today’s post of the day comes from Mark Toth’s Manpower Employment Blawg.  The post is entitled: “How Employers Use Social Media” and is based on the readily observable notion that “[m]ore and more employers are using social media to gather ‘intelligence’ on employees and potential candidates.”

The article walks you through a bunch of interesting statistics about what social media sites employers are using to evaluate employees and job candidates and utilizes real-world examples of tweets (Twitter) and Facebook status updates that have resulted in current employees getting canned and job hunters getting passed over.

To his credit, Mr. Toth also discusses how job candidates are successfully using social media to increase their chances and the particular information that employers look for when evaluating candidates online.  The bottom line, according to the post:

Your employees are using social networking tools. If you don’t, too, you might be missing a hugely valuable source of information.

So, get connected. But be careful about anything (1) you personally post and/or (2) use to make employment decisions. For the former, use our time-honored “mom” test (don’t say anything you wouldn’t want your mother to read). For the later, the test is simple: job-related, job-related, job-related. If it ain’t, don’t use it.

My $0.02: As a management-side employment law attorney (aka employment defense attorney), I can confidently say that, in addition to having your employers scour your social media activities, your employers’ lawyers are doing the very same thing.  Every time that your employer catches wind of a grievance, administrative charge, EEOC complaint, or a potential employment-related lawsuit, they will likely be all over your social media sites (like white on rice).  At a minimum, you can rest assured that, when I get retained on a case, social media sites are one of the first places I go.  That fact alone should give additional importance to the “mom” test described by Mark Toth.